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October 2022

WBC Scottish Tour - Draft Itinerary

September 2022

News Items 

The Access for All Path at Minsmere - what it means to me

By Stephen Dean

One of the birds I most wanted to see in Britain was the Common Nighthawk, an enigmatic relative of the Nightjar that is a very rare vagrant from North America. The place in Britain where they have been found most often is the Isles of Scilly, but in 12 October birding holidays there I saw lots of other wonderful birds, but no Nighthawk. Then, in 1998, one was found on St. Agnes...

Picture the scene: I am with three friends and we have driven overnight to Penzance. We know the bird is still there. We have checked in for our flight and we are waiting in the departure lounge. The pager goes off and the message says that the bird has died!

Since then my mobility has become very limited and if I need to walk for any distance outside I have to use a mobility scooter. I also find it hard to stand and use my bins for long and so sitting down on my scooter or in a hide makes all the difference. My birding has been very restricted by these limitations and I thought my chance of ever seeing a Nighthawk in Britain had gone. Then, on 26th September 2022, one was found on a garden fence in the small Oxfordshire town of Wantage. A friend of mine was going and my partner, Louise, and he were able to get my mobility scooter into the boot of his car. When we got to Wantage, we parked as close as we could to where the bird was, set up the scooter and made our way along the pavement, crossed one road, turned left, crossed another road and then turned right into the quiet residential close where the Nighthawk was perched on a fence on the opposite side of the road, seemingly oblivious to the hundred or so birders less than 20 yards away!

The views of the Nighthawk were way beyond my wildest dreams. My metaphorical and literal journeys to that moment of connection had needed a lot of determination and I would not have been able to fulfil this long-held ambition without the help of others, my mobility scooter and scooter-friendly surfaces to ride it on (the Nighthawk's journey to that point, of course, was an unimaginable feat of survival).

So, what's this all got to do with Minsmere? Well, I first went to Minsmere in 1976 and fell in love with the place and its birds straightaway. I recall that day, and the nine species I saw for the first time in my life, as if it were yesterday. Minsmere formed the backdrop to many of my formative birding lessons and experiences over the years and I have missed that in recent times as my ability to simply go for the day, on a whim, and enjoy walking around has gone.

Now, the hard work of the Waveney Bird Club, the RSPB and others to get an accessible path built between the North Wall and the East Hide is coming to fruition, which will make a huge difference to me and many others whose mobility is restricted. I am really looking forward to being able to get to the East Hide (which has been extended) on my mobility scooter and enjoy the simple pleasure (that I took for granted for so many years) of sitting and watching the wildfowl, waders, gulls, terns and many other birds.

Thanks to Kathy Piotrowski, who first suggested the idea, and the tireless work of the Waveney Bird Club to initiate the project and raise funds, this is actually going to happen. It's great for there to be a good news story for a change and to all those Club members who have donated money and supported this project in other ways I say a heartfelt thank you!

I look forward to seeing you in the East Hide.

Stephen Dean

Common Nighthawk, Oxfordshire, September 2022

Common Nighthawk, Oxfordshire, September 2022 - at last!

Minsmere Access for All Path

21st September 2022 update

Since the images taken on the 15th (see below), work has been progressing well as these new images (and video) from Steve and Kathy show.

Minsmere Access for All Path

15th September 2022

The path project construction finally got underway this week and I thought you might like to see some pictures. We cut the path through the grasslands before Gilleards arrived on site, and now already we have a bridge and they are cracking on with installing the uprights which will hold the boardwalk. I’m very glad we did go for the boardwalk option in the end; even with this dry summer the last section close to the hide is really soggy and the team are adamant they only want to take the digger through once! So we are working from the bridge end and heading northwards. They estimate 7 weeks to completion but if nothing goes wrong and the weather stays dry I can see it being achieved in even less time.

Katie Fairhurst
Warden, North Suffolk Coast Reserves

Click images to enlarge

tree-creeper-img_7802

Lucky escape for Treecreeper!

I thought you might like to see this. Whilst enjoying a leisurely coffee this morning there was a (mercifully dull) thud on the lounge window. On investigating I found a stunned Treecreeper on the patio. As it was so cold this morning I picked it up in a tea towel to keep it warm whilst it hopefully recovered. About 10 minutes later it started giving its characteristic squeak and so I carefully put it on a pile of tree stumps at the bottom of the garden near the mature trees and stood guard in case Maia (our cat) should appear. About a minute later it flew away seemingly none the worse for the experience.

A very nice addition to my garden list.
Steve Hardy

tree-creeper-img_7799
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Frampton/Gibralter Point trip (16-18 September)

Picture of the group at the chippie in Chapel St Leonards. Report to follow.